What others say

Lawrence Munro, African Parks Field Operations Manager

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“Coming to an event such as this one [Viet Nam Public Hearing], is a big eye opener. When I was doing the research prior to accepting the invitation to come here, I immediately thought: yes, this is one that is good, what these guys are doing is positive- it is a good action and it is nice for a ranger to see and hear this”

 

 

Tom Milliken,  Elephant and Rhino Programme Leader at TRAFFIC

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“The Wildlife Justice Commission really needs to be congratulated for the excellent investigations they have done, but also for the public presentation. I think is just so enlighting for many people to really understand what is going on and if this can play a role in creating the momentum in Viet Nam to really, fundamentally change the way they are doing business on wildlife trade issues, we are all going to win.”

 

 

Ghida Fakhry, International broadcast journalist. Director of Proceedings for the Viet Nam Public Hearing 2016

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“I am thrilled and honoured to serve as Director of Proceedings for the Wildlife Justice Commission’s first Public Hearing. It highlights the Wildlife Justice Commission’s unwavering commitment to expose and disrupt the networks behind the illegal international trade in wildlife, particularly elephant ivory and rhino horn.

By putting a spotlight on this important and urgent issue, the Wildlife Justice Commission is sending a clear message to those who are actively involved in wildlife crime, and those who turn a blind eye to it. I look forward to facilitating a critical, open and fruitful discussion of the evidence gathered by the Wildlife Justice Commission’s extensive investigation in an even-handed and action-oriented way.”

 

Michael Wamithi, Supervisory Board

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“Why I strongly support the Wildlife Justice Commission is that for the first time is it bringing together, on top of the normal collaboration between agencies and organisations fighting criminal networks globally, […] the criminal justice system with law enforcement and experts in wildlife conservation. The Wildlife Justice Commission, through its Map of Facts, will be providing direct evidence to governments that is prosecutable in court, so no longer will governments have an excuse as to why they should not prosecute a case. So this is an addition to the previous process by providing governments with instruments to implement their own laws.”

 

 

Pieter Stemerding, Managing Director, Adessium Foundation

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“Quick word on the Wildlife Justice Commission: we just got a briefing at the Adessium Foundation we are incredibly impressed by the work, by the engagement of the team and by the initial results they are getting and we hope to be able to support this in the longer run and we hope others will follow our example.”

 

 

His Royal Highness Senior Chief Inyambo Yeta of the Royal Establishment of Barotseland in Zambia

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“The people in Africa live off the land, they live off the wildlife, they live off the fisheries and they live off forest. Take that away from them and you’ve created poverty overnight. Our future depends on eradicating wildlife crime, with organisations like the Wildlife Justice Commission, working together with governments, other NGOs and on the ground initiatives both locally and globally to make this possible.”

 

 

 

Andrew Parker, Joint Operations Director, African Parks Network

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“Despite the best efforts of the international conservation community, losses of elephant, rhino and other threatened African species such as pangolin continue to mount whilst the risks for the criminal bosses remain negligible to non-existent. The long-term solution to illegal wildlife trafficking almost certainly lies in the economic empowerment of rural communities, the transfer of risk from Africa through the entire black market value chain to the demand states and the mobilisation of political will. The systems meant to secure the persistence of Africa’s wildlife are largely failing and this is where the work of the Wildlife Justice Commission is so important. Building a body of evidence that cannot be ignored, suppressed or whitewashed represents a compelling mechanism to achieve accountability at a political level and to start transferring risk to demand states. At African Parks we are watching with great anticipation to see the work of the Wildlife Justice Commission be transformative in the fight against wildlife crime”.

 

Dr. Hon Elizabeth Quat, JP, Legislative Council Member, Hong Kong

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“I support The Wildlife Justice Commission because it assists national authorities in activating wildlife justice through existing laws”

 

 

 

Major General Johan Jooste, Commanding Officer Special Projects, South Africa National Parks

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“The document [Map of Facts] that I was exposed to in The Hague at the Wildlife Justice Commission earlier this year compiled by our friends and colleagues was dynamite. It’s the sort of thing that can blow part of the crime network out of the system of those who plague us and our rhinos.”

 

 

Christopher Parker, Oak Foundation 

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“Having seen the impact of wildlife crime up close, the work of the Wildlife Justice Commission is refreshing in its direct and innovative approach. At Oak Foundation we’re committed to urgent action based initiatives, adding a further angle to existing global efforts, such as those taken by Wildlife Justice Commission. Time is of the essence with wildlife crime and trafficking, as such it is a priority for Oak Foundation.”